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Biography of John Horne

I am an active historian. I retired as Professor of Modern European History at Trinity College Dublin (TCD) in September 2015, where I remain Fellow emeritus. I directed the Centre for War Studies, of which I was co-founder in 2007, until summer 2016. I am a Member of the Royal Irish Academy. I continue to be active in research, writing and speaking on history.

Part English, part Australian, I grew up and was educated in both countries. Following a BA (Hons.) in History at the University of Oxford (Balliol College), I obtained my doctorate in contemporary history at the University of Sussex in 1980. My first post was lecturer at Trinity College Dublin in 1977 where I worked until retirement. I was the first Director of European Studies in TCD from 1992-1994, designing the programme and building a network of ERASMUS academic exchanges. I was Head of the Department of History from 2001 to 2003. In 1994-5, I was an associate member of the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, and in March 1997 and May 2005 I was an associate member of the Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales (EHESS), Paris. Since 2003 I have been a member of the Board of the Historial de la Grande Guerre, Péronne, which is the most important museum of the Great War on the former western front and the only one with a major research centre. I am a founder member of EURHISTXX, a consortium of universities and research institutes that explores transnational approaches to the contemporary history of Europe. In 2005, I was elected to the Royal Irish Academy and also invited to deliver the annual Marc Bloch lecture in the Paris City Hall by the EHESS (http://cmb.ehess.fr). In 2012-2013 I was a Senior Visiting Fellow at the Freiburg Institute for Advanced Study in Germany, in 2015-16 Visiting Olivers Smithies Fellow at Balliol College, and in 2016-17 Leverhulme Visting Professor of History at the University of Oxford (affiliated to St Antony’s College). During the centenary of the Great War I served as a member of the French Mission Nationale pour le Centenaire de la Grande Guerre.

I am Vice-President of the International Research Centre, a specialist in twentieth century French and European history, I have published a number of books and over 100 articles and chapters in edited books on the history of the labour movement, social history and on the comparative and transnational history of the Great War. Among my publications are: Labour at War. France and Britain, 1914-1918 (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991); (ed) De Gaulle and Twentieth Century France (London: Edward Arnold, 1994); (ed.), State, Society and Mobilization in Europe during the First World War (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1997); with A. Kramer, 'German Atrocities', 1914. A History of Denial (New Haven & London: Yale University Press, 2001); (ed.) A Companion to World War One (Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell, 2010); (ed.), Vers la guerre totale: le tournant de 1914-1915 (Paris: Tallandier, 2010); (ed., with Robert Gerwarth), War in Peace: Paramilitary Violence in Europe after the Great War (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2012). German Atrocities won the Fraenkel Prize (Institute for Contemporary History, London) and has been published in German and French.

In 2008, I was invited to represent Ireland in a project to mark the French presidency of the Council of Europe in which one historian from each member state of the EU would deliver a lecture in France on an aspect of European history. My lecture was delivered at the Centre Pompidou in Paris on “Guerres et réconciliations au vingtième siècle” (European Wars and Reconciliations in the Twentieth Century), and was published in 27 Leçons d’histoire (Paris: Seuil, 2009) and in an extended version by Vingtième siècle, 104, 2009.

As an historian working in Ireland, I have contributed to the recovery of the history of the Irish in the First World War. To that end, I organized a series of lectures on national radio in Ireland (RTE 1) on what was then still a controversial subject. These were published as Our War: Ireland and the Great War (Dublin: RTE/Royal Irish Academy, 2008, new edition 2012). I also ran a funded project with one of my former PhD students, which resulted in a collaborative volume exploring the difficult relationship between commemoration and history, (ed., with Edward Madigan), Towards Commemoration: Ireland in War and Revolution, 1912-1923 (Dublin, Royal Irish Academy, 2013).

In 2009-2011 I conducted a two-year collaborative research project with Professor Robert Gerwarth on ‘Paramilitary Violence after the Great War: towards a Global Perspective’ which resulted in a joint article published by the Journal of Modern History in September 2011 and an edited book, War in Peace: Paramilitary Violence in Europe after the First World War (Oxford University Press, 2012). From 2014 to 2016, I was the Principal Investigator in TCD on a project with three other universities (two in the UK, one in Germany), ‘Making War, Mapping Europe: Militarized Cultural Encounters, 1792-1920,’ which was funded by HERA (Humanities in the European Research Area – €1.2 million). The collective book from this project will be published in 2018 (Joseph Clarke and John Horne [eds.], Militarized Cultural Encounters in the Long Nineteenth Century: Making War, Mapping Europe [Palgrave Macmillan].

My other projects include a collaborative project with EURHISTXX on the three post-war periods of 20th century European history (after the two world wars and the Cold War) – published by Bloomsbury in 2019 as Europe’s Postwar Periods – 1989, 1945, 1918: Writing History Backwards (edited by Martin Conway, Pieter Lagrou and Henry Rousso), and an iconographic study of symbolic monuments to the nation across Europe between 1840 and 1914. Each of these is an experiment in writing the transnational history of Europe.

I have taught undergraduates extensively during my career in the history of Europe since the French Revolution, the social, political and cultural history of 19th and 20th century France and the comparative history of the Great War. I have also taught at Masters and Doctoral level, including the Masters courses in TCD on European Studies and on Public History. In February 2019 I taught an honours undergraduate course at Penn State University on ‘Mass Death and National Monuments: the Memory of World War One in the USA.’ This focused on the project to build an as yet uncompleted national World War One monument in Washington DC and included a field trip to the capital.

I have worked in radio in Belgium, France, Ireland and the UK and have also participated in several historical documentaries for television, in Belgium, Ireland, the UK and the USA.

I have successfully supervised eighteen doctoral students on subjects relating to the two world wars and to 20th century France, helping make TCD an internationally recognized centre for studies in the First World War. Ten of the theses have been published as books.

In 2007 I co-founded the Centre for War Studies at TCD, was the first director until 2010 and was director again from 2013 to the effective end of the Centre in 2016. The Centre hosted postdoctoral fellows in a number of fields and published seven collective books and one themed issue of a journal from its collaborative projects in the period 2012-18.

Curriculum vitae.

Name: John Nicholas Horne

Born: Leicester, England, 5 February 1949

Nationality: British

University education:

  • 1967-68, University of Adelaide.
  • 1968-71, Balliol College, Oxford. B.A. (Hons.), Modern History, 1971
  • 1973-1980, University of Sussex, D. Phil., 1980.

Scholarships, Fellowships, prizes, etc:

  • Balliol History Exhibition, 1969-1971
  • Exchange scholarship (University of Sussex) at the Université de Grenoble, September-December 1975
  • Bourses d'études (French government) for research in France, 1986, 1991 and 1996
  • CNRS scholarships for research in France, 1986 and 1991
  • Irish-Belgian academic exchange for research in Brussels, September 1992
  • Member of the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton (School of Historical Studies), 1994-5
  • Visiting Associate Fellow of the Center for Historical Analysis, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey, 1994-5.
  • Visiting lectureship, Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales (Centre de Recherches Historiques), Paris, March-April 1997.
  • Fraenkel Prize in contemporary history (with Alan Kramer), 2000, for German Atrocities, 1914, co-winner of this prize awarded by the Institute for Contemporary History and the Wiener Library, London, for an outstanding unpublished manuscript in contemporary history.
  • Invited to deliver the annual Marc Bloch lecture at the Ecole des Hautes
  • Etudes en Sciences Sociales, Paris, June 2005 (also one-month visiting professorship at the EHESS).
  • Visiting Fellowship at the Freiburg Institute for Advanced Study, October 2012-July 2013.
  • Oliver Smithies Visiting Fellow, Balliol College, Oxford, 2015-16
  • Leverhulme Visiting Professor, University of Oxford, 2016-17

Visiting Honours:

  • Fellow of Trinity College (FTCD), Dublin, 1993
  • Member of the Royal Irish Academy (MRIA), 2004

Languages:

  • French; Italian; German (reading)

Employment:

  • Lecturer in modern French and European history, Department of Modern History, Trinity College, Dublin, 1977-1991
  • Senior lecturer in European history, 1991-1997
  • Associate Professor of Modern European History, Trinity College, Dublin, 1997- 2003
  • Professor of Modern European History, Trinity College, Dublin, 2003-2015 (personal chair)

International academic administrative positions:

  • Member of Board of Directors, Centre International de Recherche, Historial de la Grande Guerre (Péronne), 2002-present
  • Founding member of EURHISTXX, a consortium of research institutes and academic departments across Europe concerned with writing the contemporary transnational history of Europe (2003-present)
  • Member of the Board of Directors of the International Society of First World War Studies, 2001 to present.
  • Member of the Mission du Centenaire de la Grande Guerre (official French centenary committee), 2013- 2019.

External examining:

  • University of Wales, Swansea, B.A. in History (1996-1999)
  • University of Oxford, M. Phil. in Modern European History (2000-2003)
  • National University of Ireland – Galway, B.A. in History (2001-2005)

Teaching:

  • Courses taught include: European history (social, economic, cultural and political) since 1789; Introduction to modern Italian history; French society and politics, 1890-1945; War and society, 1914-45; European labour history,1880-1940;
  • France and the Great War; Social and cultural history of 20th century France;
  • historiography of France and the Second World War, etc.

Funded research projects (Principal Investigator):

  • ‘Paramilitary violence after the Great War – Towards a Global Perspective,’ Irish Research Council, 2008-2010. €300,000 (with Prof. Robert Gerwarth), publication War in Peace: Paramilitary
  • Violence in Europe after the First World War (Oxford: OUP, 2012) translated into 9 languages.
  • ‘Commemoration and history of Ireland’s revolutionary decade: 1912-1923,’ Trinity College Dublin
  • Foundation (private benefactor). €85,000. Publication: (ed., with Edward Madigan), Towards Commemoration: Ireland in War and Revolution, 1912-1923 (Dublin: Royal Irish Academy, 2013)
  • ‘Making War, Mapping Europe: Militarized Cultural Encounters, 1792-1920,’ HERA (Humanities in the European Research Area, with three other universities, one in Germany, two in the UK - €1.2million.

Doctoral supervision:

  • Eighteen PhD theses supervised to successful conclusion relating to the Great War in comparative and European perspective and to France and the Second World War. Ten of the theses have been published as books.